Life in Yilan

Bugs

Mosquitoes, spiders, roaches, insects of unidentifiable nature, they are everywhere! You will probably need to buy traps for roaches and ants, even if you keep your apartment relatively clean. Consider buying a mosquito repellent (they have some nice ones you can plug into the wall) for both at home and at school to save you the headache of dealing with mosquitoes. Mosquito zappers can also be helpful (you can buy one at Carrefour).

Bicycles

While not as popular as scooters, bikes can be a great way to get around Yilan and Luodong. You can get a secondhand bike for 600-1000NT through either Kelly, your host family, or coworkers at your school. This may be necessary if you have  trouble finding a bike shop. Be careful to park your bike in permitted areas. If you leave a bicycle at the train station, it will be moved by the city to one of the bike lots. As a precaution for more expensive bikes, you should also consider purchasing a bike lock.

Chinese Courses

Some ETAs have found this resource helpful. When you arrive you, will take a Chinese language placement test that may seem ridiculously hard, but you will be placed accordingly. Most people take classes for one semester; partially because classes are one of the biggest expenses here. Considering U.S. prices, the classes are still affordable. You can also work on your Chinese by meeting with language exchange partner (but this is easier if you already know some Chinese).

Extracurricular College Courses

Yilan Community College and Luodong Community College both offer a variety of fun classes. They have everything from fine arts, martial arts, cooking, to language classes. Some classes ETAs have taken include Taiwanese cooking, print and glass art, drawing, and massage. These classes are all in Chinese, so be prepared to improve your Chinese skills or take the course with someone more fluent. They classes are a really great way to get involved in the community and learn new things. Classes meet 2 or 3 hours once a week and cost between two and three thousand NT for a session (for a total of around 15 weeks). The first two weeks of each session are free drop-in classes without the need to register, so feel free to test out suitability. There are also a number of exercise classes offered at the universities. A community center and gym is located on the same street as the Teachers’ Center.

Cultural Fatigue

Over time you may become exhausted with the Taiwanese culture, whether it be the food, language, scootering, your school, or likewise. Keep doing your best at school, and find something to keep you occupied like a hobby, craft, or activities with the other ETAs and local people you have met in Yilan. Avoid sitting home alone because that will aggravate feelings of loneliness. Also, remember this is a normal stage of living and working in a foreign country; undoubtedly other ETAs will experience similar feelings of alienation. Be sure to find someone you trust to talk with and confide in.

Scooters

Scooter purchase: When deciding if you want a 50cc or 100/125cc, you should consider a couple of factors: (1) how far you will drive to school, (2) how often you will drive with more than one person, (3) if you want to keep your scooter in Yilan, or drive to other counties (4) how steep of terrain you want to be able to handle, (5) how long you want your gas tank to last, and (6) if your scooter is just getting you from point A to point B, or if you want to take it out to sightsee.

Scooter test: Make sure you actually review the signs and rules from the website Kelly gives you. Take the online practice exam multiple times to get a grasp on the different types of questions. Some people fail the written test and must to go back to the DMV a week later to retake the test (which is a big hassle). If you pass the written test, you can easily get a 50cc scooter, but if you want a 100cc or higher scooter you have to take the driving test.


Scooter types

50cc: Can go up to 60 km/h, so it’s not great for the highway. If you’re planning on using your scooter primarily for going to school and around the city, a 50cc is more than enough in most cases. While it’s possible to have two people on a 50cc, if you’re planning on giving rides to people often you should consider a bigger scooter.

50cc: Can go up to 60 km/h, so it’s not great for the highway. If you’re planning on using your scooter primarily for going to school and around the city, a 50cc is more than enough in most cases. While it’s possible to have two people on a 50cc, if you’re planning on giving rides to people often you should consider a bigger scooter.

100cc: A 100cc can safely reach up to 80 km/h. If riding on flat terrain, it has no problem with two people or even three people of smaller stature. However, it may be unable to accelerate up very steep hills and will struggle to take two people up moderate hills. While you can take it on long trips, such as from Yilan to Keelung with no problems, it will require a couple of rests and it cannot handle trips to the more mountainous counties or the cross-continental highways.

100cc: A 100cc can safely reach up to 80 km/h. If riding on flat terrain, it has no problem with two people or even three people of smaller stature. However, it may be unable to accelerate up very steep hills and will struggle to take two people up moderate hills. While you can take it on long trips, such as from Yilan to Keelung with no problems, it will require a couple of rests and it cannot handle trips to the more mountainous counties or the cross-continental highways.

125cc: A 125cc scooter could get up to 90-100km/hr or higher if you want something faster and more durable. A 125cc scooter gives no trouble when trying to go up hills with more than one person. Even used, most scooters of this variety are quite durable despite higher mileage. With the higher power capacities comes an equally higher price tag. If your Chinese capabilities are moderate, consider bringing an LET or local friend to haggle the price down.

125cc: A 125cc scooter could get up to 90-100km/hr or higher if you want something faster and more durable. A 125cc scooter gives no trouble when trying to go up hills with more than one person. Even used, most scooters of this variety are quite durable despite higher mileage. With the higher power capacities comes an equally higher price tag. If your Chinese capabilities are moderate, consider bringing an LET or local friend to haggle the price down.


Helmets and Safety: Make sure that you get a secure helmet or more for passengers. Some apartments come with helmets from past ETAs, but you never know about the quality. Spend the money on a larger helmet - at least one that covers your forehead, the entire back of your head, and the sides of your head. Those who drive further distances to work buy a heavy duty motorcycle helmet that also covers their faces and chins to protect their jaws. Make sure that you buy a helmet with a full-face visor on it. This is EXTREMELY IMPORTANT if you wear glasses when you drive, as it rains constantly in Yilan, and it is much easier to see through a visor with water on it than to see through wet glasses. This will also be useful to protect your face from bugs (some of which are unkind and will bite/sting.) You might want to purchase an extra helmet for guests to leave in your scooter compartment or apartment.

On clothing: Buy or look around in your apartment for a full-length scootering rain jacket. It rains a lot in Yilan and scootering in the rain is not fun. Don’t be embarrassed - the rain will seep into anything else except durable rainwear. At the bare minimum, at least make sure you have a decent waterproof jacket and waterproof pants. Some people like to scooter with a face mask on to protect themselves from other vehicle’s motor exhaust, dirt, dust, debris, etc. If you are driving long distances and you burn easily, it is also advisable that you consider covering up with a light long sleeve shirt, jacket, or similar items. When you are driving fast in open space, the heat may not bother you, but that sun will not be as kind to exposed skin.

Scooter Accidents

The laws/rules here are considered “suggestions” so you must be vigilant when driving. However, as in the United States, many intersections have cameras which will record and fine any traffic violators. People may cut you off, open doors in front of you, fail to signal, or run red lights. As in the U.S., be sure to drive defensively and slow down. 

Don’t hesitate to use your horn for defensive purposes. Keep in mind that there is a law against prolonged horn blowing. People will often tap their horn lightly several times as a preventative measure. Further, if you are going around a winding road with blind spots, don’t hesitate to use your horn to inform drivers coming around the turn from the opposite end that you are approaching as well.

Scooter Repairs

The Kymco shops are  great for any scooter repairs. The shop by FoGuang University near the Yamaha store (in Yilan City)  is really helpful and have been fair with their prices. When one ETA’s scooter was out of commission for a week they lent one of their scooters to use while they were repairing it. They also have great deals on scooters themselves, so they’re worth checking out when you go scooter shopping.

As a general rule, be sure to communicate with locals you turst or your LET to find the best scooter deal for your needs in the area you commute in. Make sure you have insurance for your scooter.

Other Info

Ignorance

Depending on who you are and your ethnicity, overt staring is definitely an issue in Yilan and in many places in Taiwan. The ZhongShan Park bus stop (Yilan City) can be especially uncomfortable due to older people (especially older men) gathering here, which can cause problems if you are waiting for the bus. It’s also not uncommon to see people stare at you as you walk by, or as they ride past you on their bikes or scooters. Ignorance about culture can be a problem too: it is assumed here that all Americans celebrate Christmas, Easter and Halloween, and you will likely to be expected to teach about these holidays. If you don't celebrated them, it can be uncomfortable, but it's a change to educate people about your own background and about how diverse the US is. Luodong is one of the smallest townships in Taiwan, so you may encounter ignorance about your culture or skin color. You may have to have a conversation with your school faculty to best address student and staff curiosity. Find the means to create a teachable moment.

Mold

Due to the humidity, many ETAs have had moldy clothes or shoes at some point. Buying desiccant beads or getting a dehumidifier can help. Most of the apartments have a laundromat nearby where you can use a dryer, so you can do laundry there if you’re worried about damp clothes getting moldy. If possible, leave at home anything that can’t be cleaned easily (either at the laundromat or with white vinegar to kill the mold). Dry cleaning services here are slightly cheaper than in the US, but clothing that becomes moldy once WILL become moldy again after dry cleaning. If you can live without it, leave it at home.

Drinking Water

To kill bacteria, first boil the water. After it cooks, run it through a Brita pitcher unless your sink already has a filter. During the week we get most of our water from the school or train water dispensers, but we feel safer boiling and filtering the water at home.

Taxi
The first and most important piece of advice: have two or three different taxi companies' numbers in your phone at all times. Working hours in Yilan can be a little random, so you might get an automated "We're closed" message. In Luodong, taxis are nearly always ready, waiting at the bus drop-off and pick-up points or at the front of the train station at all hours. Luodong taxis operate at all hours, and you will always get picked up to go to your location.

There are a ton of green taxi signs near bus and train stations where taxi companies have car waiting. If you can speak Chinese well, it is easy to call for a taxi from anywhere you are in the city, as long as you have a street name or location ready at hand.

Proximity to Taipei

Take advantage of Yilan’s close proximity to Taipei!-n The other locations do not have this advantage, so if you have time consider busing into Taipei on the weekends. Bus tickets from Kamalan or Capital Star are around $3 one way, so it’s not a big expense if you want to visit Taipei. If you are a frequent traveler, consider purchasing a Yoyo Card. This card is rechargeable at any convenience store, and you can get on Captial Star just by scanning it. In addition to the convenience it provides, the Yoyo Card gives your a 20% discount on the MRT. You can also use it for local trains in most of the places in Yilan and a variety of other things.

Train and Bus

The general rule of whether to take the bus or the train comes down to distance. If you're planning on going some place close like Taipei, you should take the bus. The bus schedule is great; there is no real need to buy advanced tickets, unless it’s a national holiday or during weekends. There is a bus every five to ten minutes between two great companies (each with free wifi). Additionally, scooter parking around the station is available for a small fee.

Trains are a better option for traveling farther distances. Nonetheless, you can always take the train to places just out of reach for a scooter. The train gets really crowded on weekends and holidays. As train tickets depend on the type of train you take, you will usually get a ticket with a specific seat for anything faster than a local train.

 

Workplace

ETAs may be given a desk in the office with the other teachers, which is definitely an interesting experience, or may have an individual office with their LET. Try to get involved with the other teachers and speak to them as much as you can. Practice your Chinese, as 99% of the time they will not approach you because they will think they have to speak English with you (despite demonstrating your proficiency). It will pay off if you make friends other than you LET, so do your best to get to know the other teachers.

 

In the schools farther away from the city, teachers are bound to use more Taiwanese. This can be frustrating in the beginning, especially if your Chinese level isn’t high. While communication will be difficult at first, over time you’ll be able to tell the difference between Chinese and Taiwanese. You may even pick up a few Taiwanese words.

Weather

August will be incredibly hot and humid, and it will stay that way for a couple months. It starts to get more tolerable around the end of October. While the weather cools down, winter can be cold for ETAs used to temperate weather. Even ETAs who are used to cold weather can feel uncomforably cold at home and at school in the inter since buildings are not heated. You can consider buying a space heater for your room. Many teachers like to leave all the windows and doors open to let fresh air in, but that also lets all the freezing winter air chill you. Jeans won’t will suit most at school in the winter, but others may consider more layers. Warm socks are a must as well and a good winter coat will help if you scooter to school.